EVAPREM

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Background Information regarding the Quantitative Survey

The survey focuses on the type of settlement in which the respondent resides. Type of settlement is divided into five different groups. The groups are city areas, suburbs, small towns, rural areas and remote areas. 

In Latvia, more than half (52%) of the respondents live in the city, while 16% lives in a small town and 32% of the respondents lives in the rural area. Almost half of the respondent (47%) in Denmark resided in the city area, 19% lived in suburbs, 18% in small towns and 15% lived in rural areas. 43% of the respondents in Lithuania resided in cities, 28% in suburbs, while 29% in small towns. In Estonia, 32% of the respondents lived in cities, 6 and 8 % in suburbs and small towns respectively, while the majority (55%) lived in rural areas. 27% of the respondents in Finland lived in the cities while 44% lived in the suburbs, 27% lived in the rural areas, 2% in remote areas while for 1% of Finnish respondents it was difficult to ascertain the type of their settlement (see Figure 1).

Figure 1. Type of Settlement

Figure 2 represents the main language of communication used by the respondents in all the five countries. In Denmark, 98% of the respondent said that their main language of communication is Danish while just 2% said that their main language of communication is other than Danish. 97.5% of the Finnish respondents said that their main language of communication is Finnish, while 2.5% of the respondents have said that their main language of communication is Swedish. 85 % of the respondents from Lithuania responded that their main language of communication is Lithuanian. 15% of the Lithuanian respondents said that their main language of communication is other than Lithuanian, of this 15 %, 6% said it Polish and the other 6% said it is Russian.  

75% of the Estonian respondents said that their main language of communication is Estonian, while 24% of Estonian respondents said that their main language of communication is Russian and for 1% it is other than Estonian and Russian. In Latvia, 61% of the respondents said that their main language of communication is Latvian, while 38% of Latvian respondents said that their main language of communication is Russian and for 1% it is other than Latvian and Russian (See Figure 2).

Figure 2. Main language of communication

Figure 3 shows the type of dwelling in which the respondent resides. There are three categories: “Single-family house”, “Semi-detached Apartment block with less than 8 apartments”, and “Apartment block with more than 8 apartments”. In Denmark, 78% of the respondents lived in the single-family houses, while 14% lived in semi-detached apartments and just 8% lived in apartments block with more than 8 apartments. 45% of the respondents in Finland lived in single-family houses, 15% in Semi-detached apartments and 40% in apartments block with more than 8 apartments.

In Estonia 40% of the respondents lived in Single-family houses, 11% in Semi-detached apartments and almost half of the respondents (49%) lived in apartments block with more than 8 apartments. Majority of respondents (53%) in Lithuania lived in an Apartment block with more than 8 apartments, 38 % lived in the single-family house while just 9% of the Lithuanian respondents living in a semi-detached apartment. In Latvia, 75% of the respondents lived in Apartment blocks with more than 8 apartments, while just 19% lived in single-family houses and 6% of respondents lived in semi-detached houses. (see Figure 3).

Figure 3. Type of home

Figure 4 shows the education level of the respondents in five countries. Estonia has the highest proportion of respondent with higher education with 39% closely followed by Finland with 36%. Lithuania and Latvia have 29% and 28% of respondents who have attained higher education respectively, while in demark only 18% of the respondents have attained higher education.

65% of the respondent from Lithuania have High School or Vocational Education, followed by Denmark with 63% and Latvia with 62%. In Estonia and Finland, the proportion of respondents with High School or Vocational level of Education is 51% and 50% respectively.

12% of Danish resident have an elementary education while 6% have attained basic education. In Finland, 9% of the respondents have elementary education and 6% have basic education. In Estonia, the proportion of respondent with basic education and elementary education is 9% and 1% respectively. The proportion of respondents with Basic/Elementary education in Latvia and Lithuania is 10% and 7% respectively (see Figure 4).

Figure 4. Education level

Figure 5 displays the participatory level of the respondents attending cultural events (such as theatres, cinemas, museums, libraries, art exhibitions, concerts) or participating in non-professional cultural activities. Estonia has the highest number of participation, 35% of respondents answered that they are doing it “very often” or “quite often”. Less often participation in this kind of activities are most frequent (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom” were marked by the majority (58%)), while 8% of the respondent replied that they never visit such events.

30% of respondents in Denmark answered that they are doing “very often” or “quite often”. Most often participation in this kind of activities are less frequent (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom” were marked by 63%), while 8% of the Danish replied that they never visit such events. Finland is closely followed by Denmark with 29% of the respondents responding “very often” or “quite often”, while 63% of the respondents marking “sometimes” or “very seldom” and 9% of the respondents responded that they don’t participate in such cultural event at all.

In Lithuania, 21% of respondents answered that they are doing it “very often” or “quite often”. Less often participation in this kind of activities is most popular (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom” were marked by 68%), while 11% of the population replied that they never visit such events. 18% of the Latvian respondents responding “very often” or “quite often”, while 66% of the respondents marking “sometimes” or “very seldom” and 16% of the respondents responded that they don’t participate in such cultural event at all (See Figure 5).

Figure 5. Cultural Events

According to the study carrying out some household improvement projects (like renovation, decoration, spring cleaning, gardening, repairing). In Denmark, the majority (54%) of the Danish people responded with “very often” and “quite often” in such projects, 39% answered “sometimes” or “very seldom”, while 6% admitted that they do not perform such kind of projects at all. 

The majority (51%) of the Finnish respondents answered that they are doing household improvement “very often” or “quite often”. Less often participation in this kind of projects are less frequent (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom” were marked by 38%), while 12% of the Finnish replied that they never do such household improvement project. Finland is closely followed by Estonia with 44% of the respondents responding “very often” or “quite often”, while 53% of the respondents marking “sometimes” or “very seldom” and just 2% of the respondents responded that they don’t do such project at all.

In Latvia, 22% of respondents answered that they are doing it “very often” or “quite often”. Less often participation in this kind of project is most popular (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom” were marked by 63%), while 14% of the population replied that they never undertake such projects. 13% of the Lithuanian respondents responding “very often” or “quite often”, while 83% of the respondents marking “sometimes” or “very seldom” and just 5% of the Lithuanian respondents responded that they don’t come up with household improvement project at all (See Figure 6).

Figure 6. Household improvement project

Regarding shopping, 56% of the Danish respondents answered that when they go shopping, they “very often” or “quite often” choose products based on extra qualities (such as health impact, ecological footprint, your type of brand, local origin, fair trade), 36% said that they do it “sometimes” or “very seldom”, while just 9% have not done it at all. 

The majority (55%) of the Estonian respondents answered that they are choosing products based on extra qualities “very often” or “quite often”. Less often participation in environment-friendly shopping is done by 39% of the Estonian (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom”), while 12% of the Estonian replied that they do not shop while considering such extra qualities. Estonia is followed by Finland with 44% of the respondents responding “very often” or “quite often”, while the majority (51%) of the respondents marking “sometimes” or “very seldom” and just 5% of the respondents responded that they don’t choose product based on extra qualities at all.

In Lithuania, 29% of respondents answered that they are doing it “very often” or “quite often”. Less often participation in this kind of activities is most popular (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom” were marked by 60%), while 11% of the population replied that they never visit shop this way. 23% of the Latvian respondents responded “very often” or “quite often”, while 59% of the respondents marking “sometimes” or “very seldom” and 18% of the respondents responded that do not choose products based on extra qualities (See Figure 7).

Figure 7. Choose products based on extra qualities

When asked how often they go out with their friends or acquaintances (to the cafe, restaurant, nightclub, pub), 32% of the Danish thought that it is “very often” or “quite often”. About 63% answered that it happens less frequently (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom”) and 5% answered that they never go out with their friends or acquaintances. 

In Finland, 27% of the respondents answered that they are going out with their friends and acquaintances regularly (“very often” or “quite often”). Less frequent participation in the social outing is done by most of the Finnish (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom” marked by 68%), while just 5% of the Finnish replied that they do not go out. Lithuania is followed by Finland with 23% of the respondents responding “very often” or “quite often”, while the majority (66%) of the respondents marking “sometimes” or “very seldom” and just 12% of the respondents responded that they that they never go out with their friends or acquaintances.

In Estonia, 20% of respondents answered that they are doing it “very often” or “quite often”. Less often participation in this kind of activities is most popular (answers “sometimes” or “very seldom” were marked by 68%), while 12% of the population replied that they do not go out with their friends or acquaintances. 13% of the Latvian respondents responded “very often” or “quite often”, while 56% of the respondents marking “sometimes” or “very seldom” and 31% of the respondents responded that do not go out with their friends or acquaintances (See Figure 8).

Figure 8. Going out with friends or acquaintances

Characterizing their involvement in different kinds of civic organizations, In Denmark, 28% answered that they do not take any part in this activity at all. 22% mentioned that they participate in one, 21% - in two, 14% - in three, while 15% answered that they are members of or take part in more than three organizations. Overall 72% of Danish respondents responded that they got themselves involved with at least one civic organization. 

Denmark is closely followed by Finland where 71% of the respondents participate or a member of at least one civic organization. Of this 71 %, 24% takes part in one, 22% in two, 12% in three and 14% in more than three organizations. In Estonia majority of the respondents (56%) do not take part in any civil organization, while 23% takes part in one, 13% in two, 4% in three and just 4% in more than three. 

In Lithuania, 68% of the respondents do not take part or a member of any civic organization. 24% takes part in one, 7% in two while just 1% each in three and more than three respectively. Almost four-fifths (79%) of Latvian respondents do not take part in any, 15% in one, 3% in two, 1% in three and just 2% in more than two (See Figure 9).

Figure 9. Participation in Civic Organisation

According to survey data, just 2% of the Finnish respondent does not follow the news at all. At least once a day the actual information is received by 98% of respondents: 10% answered that they read, watch or listen to the news once a day, 17% - that they do it twice a day, 13% - three times per day, while 59% replied that they do it more than 3 times a day. 

Denmark has the same proportion of respondent (98%) as Finland who follows the news at least once a day. 18% of the Danish respondent follow the news once a day, 20% twice a day, 11% thrice a day while almost half (48%) follows the news more than three times a day. In Estonia, 24% of the respondent follows the news once a day, 22% twice a day, 11% thrice a day while 32% follows it more than three times in a day. In total 89% of the respondents follows the news at least once in a day. 

Estonia is closely followed by Lithuania, just 29% of the respondents follow the news more than thrice a day while 32% follows the news once a day, 23% twice a day, 11% thrice a day and 5% do not follow at all. In total 95% of the Lithuanian follows the news at least once a day. In Latvia, 41% of the respondents follow the news once a day, 26% twice a day, 11% thrice a day while just 14% follow it more than thrice a day. 9% of Latvian respondents do not follow the news at all and overall 91% of the Latvian respondents follows the news at least once (See Figure 10).

Figure 10. Keeping up with the News